Wayne Eastcott

In 1966, Wayne Eastcott graduated with honours in painting and printmaking from the Vancouver School of Art, then embarked on a career of innovative printmaking. This led to a Canada Council Grant in 1968 for the development of new printmaking techniques, in particular the Xerox technique. He subsequently engaged the interest and active participation of Xerox Corporation in Rochester, New York and Fuji-Xerox in Tokyo, Japan where he made a defining video “Electography, what is it?” Wayne joined the art faculty of the Capilano College in 1971 and, in the same year, he and BC Binning, established the Dundarave Print Workshop in West Vancouver, which is now operating on Granville Island in Vancouver. In 1979, he established the printmaking Department of Capilano College. Wayne has exhibited nationally and internationally, including New York, Japan, Yugoslavia, Poland, Germany, Spain, India and Brazil. His work is found in many private, corporate and public collections, such as the National Gallery of Canada.

 

 

Tofino Moodyville 1, 2006
inkjet, serigraph, stencil, ed. 30
image: 16” x 22”
paper: 22” x 29.5”

$800.00

 

 

Tofino Moodyville 2, 2006
inkjet, serigraph, stencil, ed. 30
image: 16” x 22”
paper: 23” x 29”

$800.00

 

The original print Tofino/Moodyville 2 is the product of the artist’s interest in photographic images of North Vancouver’s industrial coastline, combined with appropriated imagery from the untamed west coast of Vancouver Island. It contains signature Eastcott stencil work in an elegant yet complex interplay of lines, iridescent colour and form adding visual mystery in a way that only he can do.

 

 

Moodyville Notes, 2005
archival inkjet, ed. 15
image: 16” x 22”
paper: 22” x 28”

$300.00

 

Often referred to as silkscreen printing, serigraphy is the most common kind of stencil printing. Silk is tautly stretched across a frame, and an image is created by affixing a stencil to the mesh to mask out areas dictated by the composition. Paper is placed beneath the screen and a squeegee is used to push ink through the mesh. Stencil areas obstruct the ink. Separate screens and stencils are made for each colour.

Giclee, or inkjet printing is achieved using a high-resolution printer. The minute closeness and intense colour of the ink produces a high-quality archival image. Artists often add hand-drawn or painted features to create original prints from multiples. C-Print, or a chromogenic print is the most common type of colour photographic printing. C-prints are composed of layers of cyan, magenta and yellow ink that together create a full-colour digital image.